Pan American was it’s own company until C.G. Conn purchased it in the early ’30s. Conn then used the Pan-American name as a stencil line for their intermediate models – fine horns in their own right. In the ’50s, however, Conn stopped making Conn stencils under this brand, and started purchasing horns from Martin to be stenciled with the Pan-American name until they discontinued the line altogether.

This horn is an example of a late Pan-American which is actually a late Martin Indiana that was sold by Conn (whew).Martin saxophones are an absolute shop-favorite, and their Indiana line occupy the ultimate bang-for-buck range in the current vintage saxophone market. Their intonation is above-average compared to contemporary horns from other American makers, their action is good, and their sound is big and dark and beautiful. 

This Conn Pan Indiana has seen some things in it’s life. There is some standard denting and dinging here and there. When we received it, a few of the posts had been broken off, and so were re-soldiered by a most excellent local tech. It also did not have a low D# keyguard, so we recovered one from another horn and installed it.

Otherwise, it has been regulated and plays excellently. It is in every way a late-era Martin Indiana – a big, loud, dark sound that can just as easily barwalk & belt as blow bop lines. This horn would make a killer beginner’s instrument, excellent second / marching horn, or simply a rock-n-roller for the gigs in the rougher parts of town.

ASKING: 699.99 – Make An Offer

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